catmota:

140308
Robert Nendza
more works by this artist

wethetrees:

Three of my favorite cards from The Wild Unknown’s deck. 

(Source: wethetrees)

deathtouchxoxo:

Keep It Trippy

cthulhu-jewellery:

Two new handamde Tentacled Necklaces available:
http://www.cthulhujewellery.com

motleycraft-o-rama:

By Cal Lane.

indigenousdialogues:

"[T]here was a sort of embarrassment about storytelling that struck home powerfully about one hundred years ago, at the beginning of modernism. We see a similar reaction in painting and in music. It’s a preoccupation suddenly with the surface rather than the depth. So you get, for example, Picasso and Braque making all kinds of experiments with the actual surface of the painting. That becomes the interesting thing, much more interesting than the thing depicted, which is just an old newspaper, a glass of wine, something like that. In music, the Second Viennese School becomes very interested in what happens when the surface, the diatonic structure of the keys breaks down, and we look at the notes themselves in a sort of tone row, instead of concentrating on things like tunes, which are sort of further in, if you like. That happened, of course, in literature, too, with such great works as James Joyce’s Ulysses, which is all about, really, how it’s told. Not so much about what happens, which is a pretty banal event in a banal man’s life. It’s about how it’s told. The surface suddenly became passionately interesting to artists in every field about a hundred years ago …

"In the field of literature, story retreated. The books we talked about just now,Middlemarch, Bleak House, Vanity Fair — their authors were the great storytellers as well as the great artists. After modernism, things changed. Indeed, modernism sometimes seems to me like an equivalent of the Fall. Remember, the first thing Adam and Eve did when they ate the fruit was to discover that they had no clothes on. They were embarrassed. Embarrassment was the first consequence of the Fall. And embarrassment was the first literary consequence of this modernist discovery of the surface. ‘Am I telling a story? Oh my God, this is terrible. I must stop telling a story and focus on the minute gradations of consciousness …

"So there was a great split that took place. Story retreated, as it were, into genre fiction — into crime fiction, into science fiction, into romantic fiction — whereas the high-art literary people went another way. Children’s books held onto the story, because children are rarely interested in surfaces in that sort of way. They’re interested in what-happened and what-happened-next.

"I found it a great discipline, when I was writing The Golden Compass and other books, to think that there were some children in the audience. I put it like that because I don’t say I write for children. I find it hard to understand how some writers can say with great confidence, ‘Oh, I write for fourth grade children’ or ‘I write for boys of 12 or 13.’ How do they know? I don’t know. I would rather consider myself in the rather romantic position of the old storyteller in the marketplace: you sit down on your little bit of carpet with your hat upturned in front of you, and you start to tell a story. Your interest really is not in excluding people and saying to some of them, ‘No, you can’t come, because it’s just for so-and-so.’ My interest as a storyteller is to have as big an audience as possible. That will include children, I hope, and it will include adults, I hope. If dogs and horses want to stop and listen, they’re welcome as well.”

© Philip Pullman in an interview with Barnes & Noble Review as quoted in Terri Windling’s blog Myth & Moor.

(via iseesigils)

hipinuff:

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian: 1866–1944),  Circles in a Circle, 1923. Oil on canvas, Philadelphia Museum of Art,

hipinuff:

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian: 1866–1944),  Circles in a Circle, 1923. Oil on canvas, Philadelphia Museum of Art,

(via robot-mafia)

The already cuckoo “3 Little Fishes” gets that much weirder with help from Dolly, Captain Kangaroo & a dog puppet. (from The Dolly Show, 1976)

laurapalmerwalkswithme:

Happy B-Day Elvira!

laurapalmerwalkswithme:

Happy B-Day Elvira!

(Source: trashmouth69)

Ronan Farrow gets me.

Ronan Farrow gets me.

sakrogoat:

Édouard Ravel de Malval - Death on a pale horse

sakrogoat:

Édouard Ravel de Malval - Death on a pale horse

(Source: aaronsantoro)

Forgot to post this gem last week. Characteristically spooky R.M. watching over downtown Marshalltown, IA.
via my Instagram: benconradart

Forgot to post this gem last week. Characteristically spooky R.M. watching over downtown Marshalltown, IA.

via my Instagram: benconradart

(Source: xo-skeleton)